HOW TO MAKE WAR
by Napoleon
Translated by Keith Sanford

5.25 x 8 1/2 inches, trade paperback, 166 pages, illustrated.

The art of war is a simple art and all in the execution; there is nothing vague in it, everything in it is common sense, nothing in it is ideology.—Napoleon

Ediciones La Calavera, a small press publisher in Brooklyn, New York, is pleased to announce it's latest publication: Napoleon:  How to Make War.

How to Make War is the most comprehensive collection of the military maxims of Napoleon ever published in English. The translation by Keith Sanborn is followed by a critical essay on the Napoleonic legacy by Sanborn entitled “Postcards from the Berezina.”

Since the first appearance in English of the military maxims of Napoleon in 1831, all English translations have relied upon the extremely incomplete French edition of General Burnod published in 1827. How to Make War is based on the French edition compiled by Yann Cloarec published by Éditions Champ Libre in 1973 as Comment faire la guerre. This new volume greatly enlarges and enhances our understanding of Napoleonic thought. It fundamentally reorders the texts of the Napoleonic corpus to bring an active practice of the reading to what has previously been either passively received as timeless wisdom or buried among the trivia of obsolete tactical considerations. It makes possible for the English-speaking world, a critical reassessment of Napoleon’s own reflections on politics and war, strategy and tactics.

How To Make War incorporates the French editor’s original statement and brief notes of 1973 as well as an essay by Keith Sanborn, the English language ranslator, situating the thought of Napoleon in the context of “postmodern” war and its continuation as politics. The essay explores Napoleon’s impact on thinkers ranging from Hegel, Marx and Alexandre
Kojève to Bataille, Debord—and the Situationist International—and Virilio.

Ediciones La Calavera / Small Press Distribution:   ISBN 0-9642284-2-4

Click here to order How to Make War!


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