Literature on the Age of Napoleon Website



Digital Napoleonic Fiction & Drama
About, Edmond (1828-1885) 
L'homme à l'oreille cassée (Paris, 1862) [Paris, 1876 Digital Edition: Gallica] Translated as The Man with the Broken Ear (New York, 1867)[Gaslight ed.], and Colonel Fougas' mistake: A novel, in two volumes (London, 1878); 1813 to November 1859.
Austen, Jane (1775-1817) 
Persuasion (London, 1818) [Bibliomania.com ed.] Study of manners; naval officers at home, between conflicts, 1815.

Pride and Prejudice (London, 1813) [illustrated hypertext ed. at Pemberley.com]

Balzac, Honoré de (1799-1850)
Les Chouans (Paris, 1829) from Scènes de la vie militaire. Translated as The Chouans. [Project Gutenberg ed.] An essay in the historical romance as written by Scott. Deals with the Royalist struggle in Brittany in 1799, is full of historical and local colour, and adds strong personal interest to the national issues involved. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1799-1800.

Adieu (Paris, 1830) from Etudes philosophiques. Translated variously as Farewell [Literature on the Age of Napoleon ed.] and Adieu [Project Gutenberg ed.] A strange tale set during and after the Russian campaign, with a harrowing description of the crossing of the Berezina (1812)

El Verdugo (Paris, 1830) from Etudes philosophiques. Translated as El Verdugo, [Gaslight ed.] and Project Gutenberg's version. Spanish campaign.

Une double Famille (1830) novel from Scènes de la vie privée. Translated as A Second Home [Project Gutenberg ed.].

Une passion dans le désert" (Paris, 1830) from Scènes de la vie militaire; translated as A Passion in the Desert Strand Magazine (London, 1891).[Gaslight ed.] Egyptian campaign. 

Un Episode sous la Terreur (Paris, 1831) from Scènes de la vie politique. Translated as An Episode Under the Terror [Project Gutenberg ed.] A little anecdote of some Royalists in Paris and their curious experiences. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]

Le Requisitionnaire (Paris, 1831) from Etudes philosophiques. Translated variously as "The Conscript" and The Recruit [Project Gutenberg ed.]

Le Colonel Chabert (Paris, 1832) from Scènes de la vie privée. Translated as Colonel Chabert [Project Gutenberg ed.] Colonel Chabert returns to Paris after his family believe he is killed at the battle of Eylau. 

Les Marana (Paris, 1832) from Etudes philosophiques. Translated variously as "The Maranas" and Juana [Project Gutenberg ed.] 

Histoire de Napoléon: contée dans une grange par un vieux soldat (Paris, 1833) (an excerpt from Balzac's Le Médecin de campagne from Scènes de la vie de campagne.)  English translation Napoleon of the People (1902 ed.) [Literature on the Age of Napoleon ed.] Le médecin de campagne (Paris, 1833) from Scènes de la vie de campagne. Translated as The Country Doctor.[Project Gutenberg ed.] French folktale of Napoleon's rise to power.

Une Ténébreuse Affaire (Paris, 1841) novella from Scènes de la vie politique. Translated variously as The Gondreville Mystery, An Historical Mystery, [Project Gutenberg ed.] and A Murky Business

Bauchart, Maurice Quentin (known as Jean Berleux) (1857-1910)
The End of Murat (1890) by Jean Berleux (Maurice Quentin Bauchart) from Alexandre Dumas, translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock, © 2001.
Black, Michael
Crossing Out The Emperor, a novel about the parallels in the lives of Beethoven and Napoleon.
Brontë, Charlotte (1816-1855) 
"Napoleon and the Spectre" [Gaslight ed.] Originally written in 1833; later published in a collection of Brontë juvenilia The Twelve Adventures and other stories (1925); refers to Pichegru's death.

Shirley (1856) [Bibliomania ed.] Centers on the curtailment of trade caused by the Napoleonic Wars and shows the contemporary position of women. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)]

Conrad, Joseph (Josef Teodor Nalecz Korzeniowski) (1857-1924) 
The Duel [Gaslight ed.] from A Set of Six (1908) (U.S. title "The Point of Honor") ca. 1801-1817. 

The Rover: introducing the mysterious and lovely Arlette, beside the blue Mediterranean, and sundry rugged heroes of French revolutionary days (1923) [Gaslight ed.] French fleet under Villeneuve and Nelson in early 1805. 

Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir (1859-1930)
The Great Shadow (1892) [Gaslight ed.] A little drama in which the heroine jilts the hero and elopes with an officer of the Imperial Guard. The Napoleonic terror is the “shadow” of the piece, and a fine picture of Waterloo completes the climax. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] Tale of young man coming of age on coastal Scotland, involving the landing of exiled French officer and the battle of Waterloo. [PT] 1814-1815. 

Uncle Bernac: A Memory of the Empire (1897) [Gaslight ed.] A story of the camp at Boulogne and the projected invasion of England (1804) Napoleon is powerfully and humanly portrayed. The hero and narrator is an émigré noble who serves under the Emperor; Bernac is the villain, a treacherous uncle who has usurped the family estates. Full of intrigues and sensational doings, and of celebrated personalities like Ney, Murat, Soult, Talleyrand, and Josephine. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1800-1803. (Gerard appears as minor character.) 

The Straggler of '15 (1891)  [Arthur Conan Doyle Society ed.] This short story is the basis of the later play, Waterloo.

Waterloo  [Arthur Conan Doyle Society ed.] Play first performed in 1894.

Foreign Office Romance (November 1894) [Gaslight ed.] Intrigue at the signing of the Preliminaries of Amiens, Oct. 1801. 

The Duello in France The history of duelling, from The Cornhill Magazine, Vol. XV. 1890.

Through the Magic Door Excerpts; Discussion of Napoleonic military memoirs. (1907)

How the Brigadier Came to the Castle of Gloom (Strand, July 1895) [Arthur Conan Doyle Society ed.]

How the Brigadier Played for a Kingdom" (Strand, December 1895) [Gaslight ed.] 

The Crime of the Brigadier (Strand, January 1900) [Also titled How the Brigadier Slew the Fox [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.]; appears in Adventures  publication.)Another Conan Doyle tale featuring the infamous braggart Brigadier Gerard.

How Brigadier Lost his Ear [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] (Strand, August 1902) 

How the Brigadier saved the Army [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] (Strand, November 1902)

How the Brigadier Rode to Minsk [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] (Strand, December 1902) 

Brigadier Gerard at Waterloo: The Adventure of the Forest Inn [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] (Strand, January 1903) 

Brigadier Gerard at Waterloo: The Adventure of the Nine Prussian Horseman [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] (Strand, February 1903) 

"The Brigadier in England" (Strand, March 1903) (Also titled How the Brigadier Triumphed in England [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.]) 

"How the Brigadier Joined the Hussars of Conflans" (Strand, April 1903) (Also titled How the Brigadier Captured Saragossa [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.]) 

"How Etienne Gerard Said Good-Bye to his Master" (Strand, May 1903) (Also titled The Last Adventure of the Brigadier [Sherlock Holmes on the Web ed.] 

"The Marriage of the Brigadier" (1910) Brigadier Gerard recounts an early episode of his life.

Dumas, Alexandre (1802-1870)  For more information on Dumas see The Alexandre Dumas père Web Site
La Barrière de Clichy (1851); translated as The Barricade at Clichy: A Military Drama in 5 Acts and 14 Scenes translated by Frank J. Morlock (1831, 1999 Morlock ed.)  [Dumas Website page on this drama]

Napoleon Bonaparte, ou, Trente ans de l'histoire de France: drame en six actes (1831); translated by Frank J. Morlock as Napoleon Bonaparte; or 30 Years of French History (1999 Morlock ed.) [Dumas Website page on this drama]

The Count of Monte Cristo (Paris, 1845-46) [Litrix Digital Ed.] [Dumas Website page on this novel] Imprisoned unjustly on a charge of aiding the exiled Napoleon, Edmond Dantes plots to escape and becomes wealthy and powerful. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)]

Le capitaine Richard [Dumas Website page on this novel] (translated as The Twin Lieutenants; or, the soldier's bride (1862)[Digital Ed. 1893 English translation] The Twin Captains (1861)

La San-Felice et Emma Lyonna (1863-65) [Dumas Website page on this novel] Translated as The Neapolitan Lovers and Love and Liberty (follows Neapolitan Lovers) (also titled: The Lovely Lady Hamilton; The Beauty and the Glory) Naples during the French Revolutionary period, featuring Lord Nelson. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)] Emma Lyonna: Gallica Digital Ed.

The San Felice A drama by Maurice Drack (Auguste Alfred Poitevin) from the novel, La San Felice by Alexandre Dumas pere, 1881, translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock, © 2001.

Edwards, Amelia Ann Blanford (1831-1892) 
Monsieur Maurice, A New Novelette. (Leipzig, 1873) 
  • A Service of Danger [Gaslight ed.] (1796-1800) Austrian army. 

Erckmann, Emile (1822-1899) and Chatrian, Louis-Alexandre (1826-1890)
L'Histoire d'un Conscrit de 1813 (Paris, 1864) [ABU: la Universelle ed.] (translation; The Conscript; a story of the French War of 1813) A story of the French campaigns of 1812-1813, written to expose the wickedness of war. The conscript is an unfortunate peasant, half an invalid, whose prospects in life and love affairs are spoiled by the call to arms. At Phalsbourg he witnesses the passage of the Grande Armée and then is engaged in the campaigns that culminate at Leipzig. The tale is put into the mouth of a peasant, and is characterized by quaintness and simplicity. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]  (Juvenile fiction)  1812-1813.
Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn (Mrs. Gaskell) (1810-1865)
Sylvia's Lovers (1863)[The Gaskell Web ed.] A story of Whitby, owing much of its tragic feeling to the cruel episodes of impressment in the days of the French War. 1796-1800. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]
Grabbe, Christian Dietrich (1801-1836)
Napoleon, oder, Die hundert Tage : ein Drama in fünf Aufzügen. [German Gutenberg edition] Translated as Napoleon, or the Hundred Days (1831)
Hardy, Thomas (1840-1928)
The Trumpet-Major (1880) [Project Gutenberg ed.] [Black Mask Digital Ed.] A humorous story of family life and of a fickle sailor-lover. The anxiety and panic that reigned on the south coast during Napoleon’s domination are a leading motive, and there are glimpses of George III and his family at their favorite watering-place of Weymouth. 1803-1805. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]

A Tradition of Eighteen Hundred and Four (Christmas 1882) [Gaslight ed.] Covers the time period 1803-4, during the Napoleonic scare on south coast. 

The Melancholy Hussar of the German Legion (Oct. 1889) [Gaslight ed.] A tale of the German Legion on the southern coast of England, 1800-1801. 

Wessex Poems & Other Verses (1898) [Bartleby.com ed.] including: "Valenciennes" (set in 1793); "The Alarm" (set in 1803); "The Sergeant's Song" (set in 1803); "Leipzig" (set in 1813); "San Sebastian" (set in 1813) "The Peasant's Confession" (set in 1815);

 Heyse, Paul (1830-1914)
At the Ghost Hour (1894, translation) 
  • Mid-day Magic [Gaslight ed.] Ghostly tale of a young woman who lost her fiancé in the Russian Campaign.

Hugo, Victor (1802-1885) See Victor Hugo Page
Victor Hugo's Poetry and other WritingsThe Literature on the Age of Napoleon site's page devoted to Victor Hugo and his Revolutionary & Napoleonic Era writings.

Ninety-Three (1881) Dramatic adaptation by Victor Hugo & Paul Meurice, from Victor Hugo's novel Quatre-vingt-treize. Translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock, © 2000. Read the Review by C. Conrad Cady.

Quatre-vingt-treize (Paris, 1892) [Gallica Digital Ed.] French edition.

"A Fight with a Cannon" [Gaslight Digital Ed.] originally from the novel Quatre-Vingt Treize (transl. as Ninety-Three), (Book 2, Chapters III-conclusion, IV, V, and VI).

Les Miserables (Paris, 1890-1891) 5 vols. [Gallica Digital Ed.] French edition.

Les Misérables (Paris, 1862) [Project Gutenberg ed.] Gives a superb account of Waterloo from the French side. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1815-1832.

Les Misérables (Paris, 1863) Dramatic adaptation by Victor Hugo and Paul Meurice. Adapted by Charles Victor Hugo and Paul Meurice. Translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock, © 2000.

Hyne, C.J. Cutcliffe (1866-1944)
The Escape Agents (London, 1910) [Gaslight ed.] Short stories concerning Major Colt, an American in Napoleon's service, and Mlle. Clarice, a vivandière who undertake to rescue five hundred French troops marooned by the Spaniards on a Mediterranean island and guarded by a British frigate. The Sallee rovers, the French in Spain, life in Egypt, and the atmosphere of the military encampment are vigorously drawn. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1810-1811. 
  • "The New Commission" 
  • "The First Fifty-Four" 
  • "The Yellow Galley-Full" 
  • "The Pirate" 
  • "Two Duels" 
  • "Slaves in Sallee" 

Kennan, George (1845-1924) editor and translator
Napoleonder (1902) from Folk-Tales of Napoleon: Napoleonder from the Russian; The Napoleon of the people from the French of Honoré de Balzac A Russian folktale depicting Napoleon's pact with Satan; and The Napoleon of the people from the French of Honoré de Balzac (1902)
Le Fanu, Joseph Sheridan 
The Room at Dragon Volant [Gaslight ed.] from Through the glass darkly (1872) Eerie tale set in the Paris countryside following Waterloo.
Lever, Charles James (1806-1872) 
Charles O'Malley, the Irish Dragoon (Dublin: 1840-41) Vivid, rollicking adventures of military life and hard-drinking, fox-hunting Irish society. (Chapter LXXXVIII is "Patrick's Day in the Peninsula & Chapter  LXXXIX. "Fuentes d'Onoro" [Gaslight ed.]) [PT]; A story of the Peninsular War, a medley of boisterous fun, humorous character, love-making, and martial adventure, many being good stories redressed.  The great war amid which these scenes are enacted, and the romantic countries and inhabitants of Portugal, Spain, and France, afford a great variety of scenery, of adventure, and of comic and tragic incident -- the interest never flags for a moment. The humorous figure Major Monsoon is a real personage, who was actually present at occurrences that Lever could never otherwise have heard about. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1804-1814.

Marryat, Frederick, Captain (1792-1848)
Mr. Midshipman Easy (London, 1836) [Bibliomania ed.] Chapter XI of Mr. Midshipman Easy. Coming of age naval story that gives a vivid idea of active service during the great war. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] Easy is said to have been inspired by Cochrane’s youthful adventures. [PT]
Maxwell, W.H. (1792-1850)
Stories of Waterloo, and other Tales (London, 1829) Farrago of Irish stories, sensational, with a dash of Hibernian character and local colouring.  ca. 1815. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]

The Major's Story from The Bivouac, or Stories of the Peninsular War (London, 1837) Similar in style to Stories of Waterloo; short stories of Badajoz, Vittoria, etc. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]  (Chapters: VI, " The Storm of Badajoz" [Gaslight ed.], and XI, The Major's Story"

McCrae, George Gordon (1833-1927)
"Berlin (Lines on a platinum Napoleonic medal of 1806 found several years ago in Melbourne)" [Setis ed.] From The Fleet And Convoy and Other Verses (Melbourne, 1915)
Melville, Herman (1819-1891) 
In the Desert  [Gaslight ed.] (poem from Timoleon Etc., New York: Caxton Press, 1891)

Billy Budd (1924) [Bibliomania.com ed.] Set during the 1797 British naval mutinies at Spithead and Nore.

Merville (Camus, Pierre François, called) (1785-1853) & Francis
At Twenty One Years of Age! or, The Agony of Schoenbrunn (1832) by Mr. Merville & Francis; translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock, © 2001.
Mühlbach, Luise (1814-1873) (pseud. for Klara Mundt) 
The Empress Josephine: an Historical Sketch of the Days of Napoleon (1867) [Gutenberg Digital Ed.] From her birth in Martinique, but begins to be fully historical only with Josephine’s removal to France and Bonaparte’s departure from Corsica in 1779. Not only a detailed memoir of Josephine and her husband -- warmly favouring Josephine -- but also a picture of the Revolution, the ruin of the royal family, and national and European events following. 1763-1814. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]
Nievo, Ippolito (1831-1861)
Le Confessioni di un'Italiano [Digital Edition: LiberLiber] (translated as The Castle of Fratta) The fading days of the aristocracy during the time of Napoleon. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)]
Orczy, Emmuska Orczy, Baroness (1865-1947)
The Man in Grey; being episodes of the Chouan conspiracies in Normandy during the first empire (London, New York, 1918) [Gaslight ed.] 1810-1811. 
Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich (1799-1837) 
The Shot (Autumn 1830) [Gaslight ed.] from The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin

The Blizzard (Autumn 1830)  (also  translated as The Snowstorm) [Gaslight ed.] from The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin

Quiller-Couch, A.T. (Q) (1863-1944)
The Laird's Luck and other Fireside Tales (London; New York, 1901) 
  • Three Men of Badajos [Gaslight ed.] Refers to the assault on Badajos in the Peninsular war. (1808-1812)
  • Captain Dick and Captain Jacka A tale set in 1805 of free-trade and privateering in the Channel.

Rain of Dollars published in Shakespeare's Christmas and other stories(New York, 1904; London, 1905) A tale set during the Peninsular campaign.

Ye Sexes Give Ear! published in Shakespeare's Christmas and other stories(New York, 1904; London, 1905) A humorous tale about a battle of the sexes set in the days of pressgangs in Plymouth and Saltash in 1805. 

The Lamp and the Guitar published in Shakespeare's Christmas and other stories(New York, 1904; London, 1905) Another Quiller-Couch tale set during the Peninsular campaign.

Reuter, Fritz (1810-1874)
Ut de Franzosentid (1859) [German Gutenberg edition] translated as During the Time of the French Conquest or In the year '13: A tale of Mecklenburg life;  French occupation of Mecklenburg in 1813.  Reuter is the chief humourist of modern German literature. This is a story delineating country life with great liveliness, though not without touches of pathos. Reveals the depths of national feeling stirred by the French occupation, the characters being involved in the public misfortunes and doings of the invaders. Translated from the Platt-Deutsch. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1813.
Sabatini, Rafael (1875-1950)The Life & Work of Rafael Sabatini Website
The Snare (1917) [Literature on the Age of Napoleon Ed.] Revolves around Wellington's action against the French in Portugal. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)] Sabatini Website page on The Snare.
Scott, Walter (1771-1832)
The Antiquary (Edinburgh, 1816) [Black Mask Digital Ed.] This is a story of all society "from the peer to the ploughman," containing admirable character-studies and passages of great descriptive force. It presents a picture of Scotland at the time of an expected invasion by the French, when all the country displayed a ready patriotism, almost every individual enrolling himself in some capacity or other to contribute to a most determined opposition. c.1795. [Comments from Buckley & Williams' A Guide to British Historical Fiction (London, 1912)]
Staël, Madame de (Anne-Louise-Germaine) (1766-1817)
Corinne, ou, L'Italie (Paris, 1807) [Digital Ed. Gallica] Translated as Corinne, or Italy.  The novel is set in Italy, England, Scotland, and France between 1794 and 1803, telling the story of an Italian woman poet with a mysterious past.
Stendhal (Marie-Henri Beyle) (1783-1842)
La Chartreuse de Parme (Paris, 1839) [Project Gutenberg ed.] A picture of Italian society, opening with an account of the battle of Waterloo which is still famous, showing the author’s love of minor and precise “documentary” details, and his analytic methods. The view of Napoleon is very favourable. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)] 1815.
Stevenson, Robert Louis (1850-1894)
St. Ives: being the adventures of a French prisoner in England (1897) [Project Gutenberg ed.] (completed by Quiller-Couch) A posthumous romance, finished by “Q.” Stevenson calls it “A mere tissue of adventures.” It is an essay in picaresque fiction, reciting the experiences of a French prisoner of war in Edinburgh Castle, and his adventures after escaping.  St. Ives is the only gentleman among the prisoners, and suffers much in his dignity; the escape is an exciting incident, and his love-affair very romantic. 1813-1814. [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]
Thackeray, William Makepeace (1811-63)
The Tremendous Adventures of Major Gahagan appeared in The New Monthly Magazine in 1839-40. Set in the first decade of the 19th century, during the Napoleonic era, but takes place in India. Gaslight Digital Ed.

Phil Fogarty: A Tale of the Fighting Onety-Oneth by Harry Rollicker [Gaslight ed.] From Novels by Eminent Hands (1847). Napoleonic war story. Satire of Charles Lever's military stories (Harry Lorrequer stories)

Waterloo [Gaslight ed.] from Little Travels and Road-Side Sketches.

The Second Funeral of Napoleon (1841) [Gaslight ed.]

The Chronicle of the Drum (1841) [Indiana.edu ed.]

Vanity Fair; or A Novel without a Hero (1848) [Project Gutenberg ed.] "Vanity Fair" is not strictly speaking a historical novel, but Thackeray has provided a great historical setting for his characters. He desires to show how history affects his characters rather than how his characters affect history. Though the campaign of Waterloo is presented to us, the author makes no attempt to introduce Wellington or Napoleon, and we hear but distant rumble of guns and we get no nearer to the battle-field than Brussels. The novel is particularly valuable because Thackeray gives, with the truest insight and the greatest precision, a picture, conceived in broad liens, of English society in the early 19th century. [Comments from Buckley & Williams' A Guide to British Historical Fiction (London, 1912)].

Classic novel of society with an account of the Battle of Waterloo and society's attitude toward it. [Comments from McGarry & White's World Historical Fiction Guide (Metuchen, NJ, 1973)]

Tolstoy, Lev Nikolaevich (1828-1910)
Two Hussars (1856) A tale of two generations of Hussars set in the early 19th century, following the Napoleonic wars. While this is not specifically Napoleonic, Tolstoy's tale is an excellent depiction of the Hussar lifestyle and change of attitude from one generation to the next.

War and Peace (1865-72) [Friends & Partners Russian Literature ed.] Before Tilsit (1805-7); The Invasion (1807-12); The French at Moscow and Epilogue (1812-1820).  A panorama of Russian affairs, public and private, during the war with Napoleon, in the guise of a family chronicle; as De Vogüé asserts, “a summary of the author’s observations on human life in general.” Portrays a multitude of characters, officers, and men, on both the French and the Russian side, the hostile emperors and their suites, people living quietly in Moscow or on their estates, great people of fashion, serfs, etc. The more important characters are portrayed from the inside, and the reader beholds, through their eyes and coloured by their emotions, the entire life of the nation through this tremendous epoch. Real personages occupy as much space as fictitious; [...] [Comments from Ernest A. Baker's A Guide to Historical Fiction (London, 1914)]  1805-1820.

Vigny, Alfred de (1797-1863)
 Servitude et grandeur militaires: La Vie et la mort du capitaine Renaud, ou, La canne de jonc (1835) translated as Lights and shades of military life [Gaslight ed.] or  John Schneider's Napoleonic Literature ed. (London, 1840) and Military servitude and grandeur (NY, 1919) Romantic poet’s treatise on the concept of honour. [PT]
               "La canne de jonc"
               "Laurette"
               "La veille de Vincennes"


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